SOCIAL CAPITAL

Understanding the structure of the community and the way people cooperate, form connections, and participate in the life of the community helps policymakers and community stakeholders make better, more informed decisions. Measuring social capital is difficult. Groups and networks, civic engagement, and community involvement can be used as indicators, but they are difficult to quantify. However, a good start is to study and understand the demographic structure of the community, the institutions involved in service deliver, the services available to the community, and access to services. ND Compass provides information on population, median age, retirement population, and health care coverage as forms of social capital. Below is a sampling of what you can find at http://www.ndcompass.org/community-building/key-measures.php?km=socialcapital#0-9647-g.

Note: This ratio is the number of persons 65 years and older (typical retirement age) divided by the number of persons 20 to 64 years (typical working age) expressed as a percent.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Source: U.S. Census Bureau